US – Präsident George Wilhelm Bush empfang im Weißen Haus Rabiya Kadeer, Tibetische Vertreter und Chinesische Demokraten


RFA Nachrichten erstellt von Ömer Kanat

Am 29.07.2008 hat der amerikanische Präsident J. W. Bush im Weißen Haus die Präsidentin der Weltkongress der Uiguren und die Führerin die Uigurische Nationalbewegung Rabiya Kadeer unter anderem Wiy Jengshing, Hariy Wu, chinesische Demokraten empfangen.
Die Menschenrechtlerin Rabiya Kadeer teilte dem US –Präsidenten J. W. Bush die aktuelle Lage über das Uigurische Volk sowie die Unterdrückungskampagne die die chinesische Regierung gegen die Uigurische Minderheit intensiviert hat mit, dass die Menschenrechte nicht beachtet werden. Sie bat den US – Präsidenten J. W. Bush, dass er in seinem Besuch mit dem chinesischen Staatspräsident Hu Jintao über die Situation des Uigurische Volkes sprechen soll.

Rabiya Kadeer die Präsidentin des Weltkongress der Uiguren und die Führerin der Uigurische Nationalbewegung trifft den J. W. Bush US -Präsident zum zweiten Mal, das erste Treffen fand im Jahr 2006 im Hauptstadt Prag der tschechischen Republik statt, wo der Präsident J. W. Bush die Menschenrechtlerin Rabiya Kadeer für ihre Aktivitäten sehr hoch lobte.
Nach dem Treffen die Menschenrechtlerin Rabiya Kadeer in ihrem Interview sagte zum RFA Korrespondenten, dass dieses Gespräch von Rabiya Kadeer, tibetischen Vertretern und den chinesischen Demokraten mit dem US –Präsident J. W. Bush signalisiert die chinesische Regierung in gut vor 10 Tagen vor dem Beginn den Olympischen Spiele in Peking.

Von:http://www.uygur.org/de/wunn08/07_31.htm

Uyghuristan Province – The Islamic Jihad Battlefront in China

By Janet Levy

When the 2008 Summer Olympic Games were awarded to Beijing seven years ago, hope arose that China’s new-found status as a modern, world power and position in the world media spotlight would prompt increased tolerance and democracy nationwide. Clearly, that optimism has been dashed by the turmoil in Tibet.

Stellar economic performance and reforms, viewed sanguinely by the West as a sure route to liberalization, have occurred in China devoid of political reform. China’s use of brutal force and massive arrests against Tibetan protestors bear witness to this lack of progress. Indeed, China today stands revealed as one of the worst perpetrators of human rights violations and religious repression in the world.

Among those singled out for similar harshness and violence is a portion of China’s 30-million-strong Muslim community: the Islamic jihadists of the northwestern province of Xinjiang and surrounding areas. With Tibet in mind, the West may be tempted to view this decades-long unrest in Central Asia as yet another example of Chinese aggression and expansionism against a beleaguered population seeking independence. Yet, such a view is shortsighted and dangerous. For, in truth, the Islamic Jihadists of China’s Xinjiang are linked to the Taliban in Afghanistan and Al Qaeda. Their terrorist methods and ideology are of a piece with the larger Islamic Jihadist goal to overthrow existing governments and install a religious theocracy. They, in fact, represent the Chinese battlefront of the worldwide Islamic Jihad.

China’s Muslim Population

Inaccessibility to China’s far flung regions and the exclusion of questions about religion in the last three national censuses make it difficult to obtain accurate figures about the Chinese Muslim population. But it is estimated at around 30 million, the second largest religious group in China after Buddhists. About 20 million are Hui, concentrated mostly in northwestern China. Another 8.5 million are Uyghursistan province.

The Hui, culturally similar to the majority Han Chinese, follow Islamic dietary laws and some customs of Muslim dress but have engaged in only limited jihadist activity. Evidence exists of uprisings in two Hui villages, as well as some protest activity against the Danish cartoons of Mohammed. However, discrimination and economic deprivation against the Uyghurs and their push for a separate state have made for more extensive and organized jihadist activities by the militant, Uyghur Muslims throughout Central Asia. The nature of this activity — the extent to which it is an uprising for a separatist state or supports a pan-Islamist agenda — is difficult to assess given Communist China’s history of repression of religious groups, rampant human rights abuses and lack of a free press, but some conclusions can be made.

The Uyghurs

The desire for an independent Uyghur state is a fairly recent development, dating from the 1930’s, but the Uyghurs themselves are a historically nomadic people of Turkic Indo-European origin who can be traced back to the 700s.

The province in which they live, Uyghuristan , is large and sparsely populated, representing one-sixth of China’s total land mass. It borders Tibet, Russia, Kazakstan, Kyryzstan, Tajikstan, Afghanistan, Pakistan and the Indian state of Kashmir. Uyghuristan is rich in oil, gas and mineral deposits. It also has numerous military installations and, until 1996, nuclear testing facilities, giving it significant and strategic military importance to China.

The Uyghurs have a separate language, culture, religion and identity from the dominant Han, who are deemed the “true,” ethnic Chinese. Uyghurs hold a multiplicity of identities, including Muslim, Uyghur, Turk or Chinese and have historically been opposed to Han or majority Chinese rule. The Uyghurs in Uyghuristan (not Xinjang)maintain an informal ethnic apartheid. They view the Chinese as inferior occupiers, equate Confucianism and Buddhism with idolatry, and frequent their own stores and restaurants. An estimated 23,000 mosques exist in the region, with many small neighborhood facilities, some financed by Saudi Arabia and Pakistan.

According to Igor Rotar, a Central Asia correspondent for The Jamestown Foundation, Uyghurs “tend to be more zealous Muslims than their Central Asian neighbors. The majority of local, married women wear burqas, which is quite rare in Central Asia, and middle-aged men prefer to have beards.”[1] Rotar says a Uyghur Muslim in Uyghuristan explained to him that “In the Quran it is written that a Muslim should not live under the authority of infidels, and that is why we will never reconcile with the Chinese occupation.” China’s restrictive policy on family size is also a point of contention in this community.

In direct contrast to this view, visiting Associated Press reporter, William Foreman, recently observed, “Most Uighurs practice a moderate form of Islam. The men wear ornate skullcaps, or “doppi,” while most women favor head scarves but rarely cover their faces. Many can be seen dressed in tight skirts or stylish hip-hugging designer jeans and high heels.”[2]

As a non-Han people, Uyghurs have been viewed by the Chinese as inferior and portrayed as untrustworthy, shiftless, warring troublemakers. They have been discriminated against in employment and are victims of economic deprivation in an underdeveloped area. Drug use, particularly opium and hashish, is rampant and has added to the hopelessness and poverty. A high incidence of AIDS due to heroin injection appears to have attracted little government intervention to combat the problem.

The Push for Uyghur Independence

In the 1930s, Uyghur separatists proposed a constitution for a Uyghur republic that referenced Islam and shariah law but focused primarily on economic development and political freedom. The occupation of northern Uyghuristan in 1949 by China’s military, the People’s Liberation Army, was viewed as a hopeful sign because China’s leader, Chairman Mao Zedong, pledged an end to “Great Han chauvinism.” In reality, Chinese Communists valued Xinjiang, not for egalitarian reasons, but as a strategic and natural, resource-rich asset. Meanwhile, the Han-dominated, Communist Party asserted a unified, Chinese identity and sought to eliminate the distinct Uyghur culture and history.

During the Cold War, the Uyghurs of Uyghuristan, surrounded by the Chinese and the USSR, had limited options for self-determination. In the 1980s when restrictions eased in China against ethnic minorities and religious practices, the Uyghurs spoke out about discrimination and injustice. They reasserted their demands for a homeland, which continue to this day. An active Uyghur exile community in Central Asia, estimated at 400,000, has sought to draw attention to the plight of the Uyghurs and their quest for a separate state.

The Uyghur-Jihadist Link

Motivated by legitimate desires for independence, militant Turkic Muslim Uyghurs in Uyghuristan have, since the 1970’s, engaged in terrorist activities. These include killing police and military officers, robbing banks, rioting and bombing. The Uyghurs in Uyghuristan , members of the 400,000-strong Uyghurs in the diaspora and other Islamist groups in Central Asia have become part of a pan-Islamic movement that developed since the mid-1980’s and includes terrorist activity that intensified after the break-up of the Soviet Union. Islamists in Uyghuristan have reportedly received financial support and training from the Taliban in Afghanistan, Al Qaeda and the Jamaat-i-Islami of Pakistan.

The potential for the Islamization of the region and the ability of Islamists to capitalize on the existing conflict between the Uyghurs and the Chinese government is a real concern to the Communist government.

The strongest militant Islamist groups in the region include the East Turkistan Liberation Organization (ETLO), the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU) and the East Turkistan Islamic Movement (ETIM), allegedly linked to Al Qaeda. The IMU renamed itself the Islamic Party of Turkistan and publicly declared that it seeks to create an Islamic state across Central Asia and expand its recruitment efforts throughout the region. For traditional Uyghur separatists, these groups represent a source of wealthy supporters who offer funding, weapons support and terrorist training. They also help buttress and reinforce the global Islamist movement into China. For example, in 1989, Al Qaeda set up a base in China with links to the ETIM and the IMU.

Uyghuristan’s porous border with Kazakhstan, Tajikstan, Kyrgyzstan and Afghanistan facilitates the conducting of terrorist training just outside of China, as well as the movement of weapons, explosives and terrorist operatives. It also enables the indoctrination of Muslims in extremist ideology out of the reach of China.

China reports that the ETIM has ties to Central Asia Uyghur Hezbollah in Kazakstan and that 1,000 Uyghurs were trained by Al Qaeda. They maintain that 600 of them escaped to Pakistan, 300 were caught by U.S. forces on the battlefield in Afghanistan and 110 returned to China and were caught. At the beginning of the conflict in Afghanistan, U.S. forces did, in fact, report that 15 Uyghurs were imprisoned at Guantanamo Bay.

According to B. Raman, former head of the Counterterrorism Division of India’s external intelligence agency, the Uyghurs have been approached by the Hizb ut-Tahrir, a political party whose goal is to unite all Muslim countries in a unitary Islamic state. The Hizb ut-Tahrir in Pakistan and in other parts of Central Asia, has sought to use the Uyghurs to set up sleeper cells in Uyghuristan. (But this is not treu.The well endefendens for Uyghuristan)

Home-Grown Uyghur violence

However, it would be inaccurate to characterize the Uyghurs as completely influenced by outside new republik of Turkc People, for, their own history is rife with violence in the name of Islam. The first major uprising of Uyghur Muslims took place in Northwestern China in 1990 with a series of protests. As a result, China deployed troops and began to conduct military exercises in the region.

In 1996, following the first meeting of the countries that would later form the Shanghai Cooperation Organization, (Russia, China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Tajikistan), China began clamping down on the Uyghur Muslims. In an effort toward political stabilization, the Chinese implemented measures to improve the economy of the area and built roads, rails and pipelines connecting Uyghuristan with Central Asia. But an unanticipated result of this economic expansion was the establishment of alliances in border states for Islamic terrorist training and the smuggling of drugs, arms and people.

In 1997, Uyghur Islamists were responsible for several bombings, including a bus bombing in Beijing. Although an Uyghur group claimed responsibility for the Beijing bombing, Chinese media covered up this fact as they did with many other terrorist attacks prior to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks against the United States.

China’s Position on Terrorism – Pre & Post 9/11

This attitude began to change just prior to 9/11, when Taliban fighters from Afghanistan began incursions into Uyghuristan. The activities prompted formation in June of 2001 of the China-initiated, Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO). The SCO was designed to combat Islamism by setting up a terrorist monitoring center, promoting economic development throughout the region and establishing Chinese and Russian hegemony over the area.

At its first meeting, it reached an agreement calling for cooperation to prevent terrorism and insurgency, mutual identification of terrorists and terrorist organizations, suppression of terrorist activities and extradition of terrorists. Member states also agreed to create rapid deployment forces, conduct joint military exercises, investigate sources of terrorist financing and exchange information on illicit WMD manufacturing, purchase, storage and movement.

This represented a huge step forward because, up to 9/11, the Chinese government was not open about the existence and extent of jihadist activities within its country. Chinese authorities viewed acts of terrorism as a police, law-and-order issue rather than a global jihadist effort and believe that disseminating public reports on crime spreads the activity and increases unrest.

After 9/11, China changed its position to show that it, too, was a victim of the Islamist jihad. The government admitted the proliferation of terrorist activities over the previous decade, listing explosions, assassinations, poisonings, rioting and vehicle fires. At the time, they claimed to have uncovered links between Uyghur Muslim groups and Al Qaeda, Hezbollah, the Taliban and Hizb ut-Tahrir.

At a press conference in Pakistan in 2002, Chinese government officials publicized the arrest of a high-level Uyghur millitant by Pakistani authorities. The Chinese also requested that the United States repatriate 300 Uyghurs captured on the battlefield in Afghanistan, who were alleged fighters for Al Qaeda and the Taliban.

In 2003, China signed an extradition treaty with Pakistan to remand terrorists from the ETIM and the ETLO, whom they believed were affiliated with Al Qaeda and the Taliban and who had received training and funding from Osama Bin Laden. The Chinese government pressured Pakistan, known for its alliance with the Taliban and its promulgation of jihadist ideology, to turn over known Uyghur militants who had escaped to Pakistan. This appeal has not produced significant results.

Recent Uyghur Violence

Jihadist violence has continued to escalate over the last few years. In 2004, Uyghurs trained by the IMU were suspected of involvement in an explosion in Balochistan, Pakistan, in which three Chinese engineers were killed. The following year during the Eid-al-Adha religious celebrations, two explosions from suicide bombings near the Kazakstan border in Uyghuristan killed 13 people and injured 18.

In January of 2007, the Chinese raided an ETIM terrorist training camp close to the Afghanistan and Pakistan borders. The raid, in which 18 terrorist suspects died, yielded a large explosives and weapons cache. Also seized was a 32-minute video urging Uyghur Muslims to make use of key public events as a platform to publicize their grievances worldwide. It contained references to a “World Islamic Resistance Book” and the establishment of China as a jihad zone, plus included an impressive display of weapons and explosives and a demonstration of vehicle bombings.

On March 7, 2008, two men believed to be Pakistanis and a Uyghur woman who was trained by a Pakistan-based terrorist group attempted to sabotage a China Southern Airlines flight from Xinjiang to Beijing. The woman, who traveled first class, carried flammable liquids onto the aircraft that but failed to ignite them in the plane lavatory. All three terrorists involved carried Pakistani passports.

Chinese Counter-terrorist Measures

To curtail incidents like those cited above of a potentially burgeoning Islamist threat, the Chinese government maintains strict supervision over Uyghuristan and has dealt harshly with terrorist activity. China has successfully altered the demography of the region by repopulating it with Han Chinese, now the majority. To curb the influence of Islam, the government engages in surveillance of mosques, restricts the participation of youth and women in mosque activities, monitors the content of services and curtails participation in the Haj. Muslim clerics or imams who serve in the region must complete their training at a state-controlled seminary and teach “moderate” Islam under the leadership of the state.

A heavy police presence around the mosques and the military exists at the border to prevent smuggling of people and weapons. Police routinely cordon off areas in which terrorist incidents or rioting occurs and remove and imprison the agitators before they reopen the area.

Potential Threats to U.S. Security

The Xinjiang-inspired violence is not restricted, however, to attacks just against the Chinese. In May of 2002, a planned attack by the ETIM on the U.S. Embassy in neighboring Kyrgyzstan was thwarted. At the time, Pakistani authorities found blueprints indicating the location of the embassy, the American military base and a synagogue.

In view of the strategic military and economic importance of Central Asia, the need to protect its interests in the region and pressure from the Chinese, the United States agreed to classify some local groups, like the ETIM, as terrorist organizations and freeze their American assets. Of course, geopolitical concerns over maintaining good, Sino-U.S. relations played a major part in the State Department’s classification. The United States wants to ensure continued U.S. military presence in Central Asia in the midst of China’s growing economic and political power in the region and any Chinese attempts to check U.S. influence in the region.

Politics is also playing a larger role as the Olympics draw closer and the international spotlight focuses on China’s oppression of Tibetans, Falun Gong and other repressed groups. While some may be prone to view the Uyghur Muslims through the prism of China’s historical crackdown on religious groups and ethnic minorities, the record of historical, jihadist terrorist activity, listed above, would argue against it.

Despite the Unites States’ own grievances with China, serious questions should be raised to better understand the global jihad, its role in China and our fight in the war against Islamic terrorism.

We should ask: how much of the Uyghur separatist struggle has been co-opted by the Islamists and is being used to breed fellow travelers for the jihadist agenda? Who are victims — the Uyghurs, China or both? Is it realistic for China to fear Islamic extremism, territorial expansion and the spread of insurgency to other aggrieved groups? Is China using the excuse of terrorism as an excuse for a crackdown on the Muslim Uyghurs or is China a victim of the extensive network of Islamic terrorist groups in Xinjiang and Central Asia? Have the Islamists joined forces with Uyghur separatists to capitalize on the struggle in Tibet? Is the West failing to differentiate between radical Islam and legitimate human rights grievances? Is China’s “Strike Hard” policy serving to radicalize the Uyghurs and causing them to find common cause with the Islamists? Finally, how can the United States assist China in the mutual fight against global Islamic terrorism and, at the same time, successfully address issues of religious repression and civil rights?

As China faces world scrutiny and the threat of disruptions and boycotts against the upcoming Olympics for its ruthless civil rights violations, we should be mindful of the growing Islamization of the Xinjiang province under the Uyghur conflict. Clearly, jihadist groups are active in the region and have coordinated terrorist actions, recruitment, training and financing. They are dedicated to the establishment of an Islamic state in Central Asia, related to the worldwide Islamic jihad.

As has been evident in other parts of the world, Islamists deftly graft their agenda onto regional political struggles to form unholy alliances and advance their pan-Islamist agenda. We should not be deceived by our zeal to focus on human rights abuses in China or focus entirely on Tibet and the separatists. Instead, this important component of unrest in Central Asia needs its own specific analysis, political action and focused response.

From:http://www.americanthinker.com/2008/04/xinjiang_province_the_islamic.html

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[1] Rotar, Igor, “The Growing Problem of Uighur Separatism”, China Brief, Volume 4, Issue 8, The Jamestown Foundation, April 15, 2004, http://www.jamestown.org/publications_details.php?volume_id=395&issue_id=2935&article_id=236612

[2] Foreman, William, “China Faces Muslim Resentment in West,” Yahoo News, April 9, 2008, http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080409/ap_on_re_as/china_resentful_muslims

Chinese authorities deny Uighur group behind attacks: state media
AFP – July 27, 2008, 1:36 am

Chinese authorities on Saturday denied claims by a Uighur separatist group that it was behind deadly bus bombings in two cities, state media reported.

The group, which calls itself the Turkestan Islamic Party, claimed responsibility for a pair of bus blasts that killed two people Monday in southwest China, and said it would target the Beijing Olympics next month.

It made the comments in an online video statement transcribed by the Washington-based IntelCenter.

The separatist group also claimed responsibility for a bus explosion in Shanghai in May that killed three people, according to the centre, which monitors threats by extremists on the Internet.

But a public security official in Yunnan province, where Monday’s blasts happened, said no evidence had been found linking the explosions with terrorism, according to the official Xinhua news agency.

“We have noticed media reports about the claims, but so far no evidence has been found to indicate the explosions were connected with terrorists and their attacks, or with the Beijing Olympics,” Xinhua quoted the official as saying.

Police in Shanghai also denied the claims, Xinhua said.

“The (May 5) blast was indeed deliberate but had nothing to do with terrorist attacks,” Cheng Jiulong, deputy head of Shanghai police, told Xinhua.

In the video statement claiming responsibility for the bombings, Commander Seyfullah of the Turkestan Islamic Party warned of more attacks to come.

“Through this blessed jihad (holy war) in Yunnan this time, the Turkestan Islamic Party warns China one more time,” Seyfullah said in the video dated July 23, according to a transcript from the IntelCenter.

“Our aim is to target the most critical points related to the Olympics. We will try to attack Chinese central cities severely using the tactics that have never been employed,” he continued.

The group also claimed responsibility for bombing a plastic factory in southern Guangdong province on July 17 — a claim denied by provincial police who said “there were no terrorist attacks on July 17 in Guangdong,” Xinhua reported.

The Turkestan Islamic Party is another name for the Islamic Party of East Turkestan (ETIM), a group seeking independence for Xinjiang, a Muslim-majority northwest region of China, according to global intelligence analysts Stratfor.

Police in Xinjiang said they had taken note of the group’s claims.

“We will continue to keep a close watch over the social situation in Xinjiang and strive to ensure Olympic security,” a public security bureau spokesman told Xinhua.

“We have dispatched hundreds of police officers who can speak Uighur ethnic language to major cities in other provinces this year to assist in ensuring local social stability,” he said.

China has previously said Muslim separatists in Xinjiang were planning attacks on the Olympics, a claim backed up by some security experts.

“There are a number of terrorist groups seeking to attack China at this point in time, but the group with the intentions and capability to mount attacks in China is ETIM,” said Rohan Gunaratna, head of the Singapore-based International Centre for Political Violence and Terrorism Research.

“It’s impossible for a terrorist group to do a big attack in China because the Chinese have taken many security measures, but it’s very likely there will be small and medium attacks in the lead-up, during and after the Olympics.”

However, rights groups have accused the government of exaggerating or fabricating the threat as an excuse to silence dissent in the Xinjiang region, where many complain about decades of repressive Chinese rule.

Dilxat Raxit, a spokesman for the World Uighur Congress, an exile group, on Saturday said Uighurs in Xinjiang did not engage in terrorism.

“China wants to prove there is terrorism in Xinjiang to continue to repress Uighurs in the region,” he said.

China’s foreign ministry and ministry for public security refused to comment on the group’s claims when contacted by AFP.

From:http://au.sports.yahoo.com/olympics/news/article/-/4826788/chinese-authorities-deny-uighur-group-attacks-state-media

FEATURE-Radical Islam stirs in China’s remote west on July 28 2008 06:26:08 GMT

By Ben Blanchard By Ben Blanchard

KASHGAR, China, July 28 (Reuters) – In a backstreet of the old Silk Road city of Kashgar, Chinese authorities have been spray-painting signs on dusty mud brick walls to warn against what it says is a new enemy — the Islamic Liberation Party. KASHGAR, China, July 28 (Reuters) – In a backstreet of the old Silk Road city of Kashgar, Chinese authorities have been spray-painting signs on dusty mud brick walls to warn against what it says is a new enemy – the Islamic Liberation Party.

Better known as Hizb ut-Tahrir, the group says its goal is to establish a pan-national Muslim state, or Caliphate. Better known as Hizb ut-Tahrir, the group says its goal is to establish a pan-national Muslim state, or Caliphate.

China says Hizb ut-Tahrir are terrorists operating in the far western region of Xinjiang, home to some 8 million Muslim, Turkic-speaking Uighurs, many of whom chafe under Chinese rule. China says Hizb ut-Tahrir are terrorists operating in the far western region of Xinjiang, home to some 8 million Muslim, Turkic-speaking Uighurs, many of whom chafe under Chinese rule.

But the group and some observers say it does not espouse violence and accuse China of playing up the threat as an excuse to further crack down in restive Xinjiang, especially ahead of the Beijing Olympics. But the group and some observers say it does not espouse violence and accuse China of playing up the threat as an excuse to further crack down on restive Xinjiang, especially ahead of the Beijing Olympics.

“Strike hard against the Islamic Liberation Party” and “The Islamic Liberation Party is a violent terrorist organisation” read the signs in Kashgar, written in red in both Chinese and Uighur’s Arabic-based script. “Strike hard against the Islamic Liberation Party” and “The Islamic Liberation Party is a violent terrorist organisation” read the signs in Kashgar, written in red in both Chinese and Uighur’s Arabic-based script.

Residents passing by appear to pay little heed to the notices, accustomed to barrages of government propaganda denouncing “splittism”, “illegal religious activities” and calling for ethnic unity and harmony. Residents passing by appear to pay little heed to the notices, accustomed to barrages of government propaganda denouncing “splittism”, “illegal religious activities” and calling for ethnic unity and harmony.

“I don’t know what that group is,” said one Uighur, who declined to give his name, shaking his head and scurrying away. “I do not know what that group is,” said one Uighur, who declined to give his name, shaking his head and scurrying away.

As in another strife-hit Chinese region, Tibet, many Uighurs resent the growing economic and cultural impact of Han Chinese who have in some cases been encouraged by the government to move to far-flung and under-populated parts of the country. As in another strife-hit Chinese region of Tibet, many Uighurs resent the growing economic and cultural impact of Han Chinese who have in some cases been encouraged by the government to move to far-flung and under-populated parts of the country.

Beijing accuses militant Uighurs of working with al Qaeda to use terror to bring about an independent state called East Turkestan. Beijing accuses militant Uighurs of working with al Qaeda to use terror to bring about an independent state called East Turkestan.

The government says it has foiled several Xnjiang-based plots this year to launch attacks during or in the run-up to the Games, including one which apparently would see athletes targeted by suicide bombers or be kidnapped. The government says it has foiled several plots Xnjiang-based this year to launch attacks during or in the run-up to the Games, including one which would see athletes apparently targeted by suicide bombers or be kidnapped.

But the emergence of Hizb ut-Tahrir is a recent phenomenon in Xinjiang. But the emergence of Hizb ut-Tahrir is a recent phenomenon in Xinjiang.

“The organisation is extremely resilient and its influence, although limited to southern Xinjiang, seems to be growing,” said Nicholas Bequelin of Human Rights Watch. “The organisation is extremely resilient and its influence, although limited to southern Xinjiang, seems to be growing,” said Nicholas Bequelin of Human Rights Watch.

“The prison authorities are also worried about the influence of Hizbut followers on other inmates,” he added. “The prison authorities are also worried about the influence of Hizbut followers on other inmates,” he added.

But it seems unlikely they represent the threat to Xinjiang that China likes to portray, said Dru Gladney, a Uighur expert and president of the Pacific Basin Institute at Pomona College, California. But it seems unlikely they represent the threat to Xinjiang that China likes to portray, said Dru Gladney, a Uighur expert and president of the Pacific Basin Institute at Pomona College, California.

“For most Uighurs who are activists, though some of them are very religious in their Islam, their main goal is sovereignty for Xinjiang. Hizb ut-Tahrir doesn’t support that. They support a worldwide Caliphate, not any one independent region,” he said. “For most Uighurs who are activists, though some of them are very religious in their Islam, their main goal is sovereignty for Xinjiang. Hizb ut-Tahrir does not support that. They support a worldwide Caliphate, not any one independent region,” he said.

RUNNING ON XINJIANG TIME RUNNING TIME ON XINJIANG

Though a part of China, many areas in Xinjiang feel a world away from the booming and cosmopolitan cities on the Chinese coast, far to the east. Though a part of China, many areas in Xinjiang feel a world away from the booming and cosmopolitan cities on the Chinese coast, far to the east.

In Kashgar, a city close to the Pakistan and Afghan borders, some women not only cover their heads, but also veil their faces. In Kashgar, a city close to the Pakistan and Afghan borders, some women not only cover their heads, but also veil their faces. In some cases, dark brown cloths envelope the whole head. In some cases, dark brown envelope cloths the whole head.

Clocks in many mosques, restaurants, cafes and shops are set to Xinjiang time. Clocks in many mosques, restaurants, cafes and shops are set to Xinjiang time. This is two hours behind Beijing time, the official standard for the entire country, which means China’s sun does not set until after 10 pm in Kashgar in the summer. This is two hours behind Beijing time, the official standard for the entire country, which means China’s sun does not set until after 10 pm in Kashgar in the summer.

Exiled groups and human rights campaigners have long chastised China for its religious restrictions. Exiled groups and human rights campaigners have long chastised China for its religious restrictions. The government hits back and says it guarantees freedom of religion in its constitution, as long as believers respect the law. The government hits back and says it guarantees freedom of religion in its constitution, as long as believers respect the law.

Many are not convinced Hizb ut-Tahrir is the threat the Chinese government says it is in Xinjiang. Many are not convinced Hizb ut-Tahrir is the threat the Chinese government says it is in Xinjiang.

“This does not exist. They have come up with this group’s name themselves,” said Dilxat Raxit, spokesman for the exiled World Uyghur Congress. “This does not exist. They have come up with this group’s name themselves,” said Dilxat Raxit, spokesman for the exiled World Uyghur Congress. “They are trying to mislead the world and deflect from concern for the Uighur people.” “They are trying to mislead the world and deflect from concern for the Uighur people.”

For its part, Hizb ut-Tahrir denies it advocates violence. For its part, Hizb ut-Tahrir denies it advocates violence.

“Hizb ut-Tahrir and Muslim voices that do not toe the government line have been severely oppressed by the Chinese government,” Taji Mustafa, media representative for Hizb ut-Tahrir Britain, told Reuters in an emailed statement. “Hizb ut-Tahrir and Muslim voices that do not toe the government line have been severely oppressed by the Chinese government,” Taji Mustafa, media representative for Hizb ut-Tahrir Britain, told Reuters in an emailed statement.

“It is well known across the world that since its founding in 1953, Hizb ut-Tahrir has exclusively engaged in non-violent political and intellectual work,” Mustafa added. “It is well known across the world that since its founding in 1953, Hizb ut-Tahrir has exclusively engaged in non-violent political and intellectual work,” Mustafa added. He did not comment on whether the group was active in Xinjiang. He did not comment on whether the group was active in Xinjiang.

SPLITTISM

China maintains the threat is real. Hizb ut-Tahrir is likewise banned in countries such as Uzbekistan, where it has also been blamed for violence. China maintains the threat is real Hizb ut-Tahrir is likewise banned in countries such as Uzbekistan, where it has also been blamed for violence.

In November, China’s Xinhua news agency announced sentences ranging from death to life in jail for six Uighurs accused of “splittism and organising and leading terrorist groups”, and implicated Hizb ut-Tahrir. In November, China’s Xinhua news agency announced sentences ranging from death to life in jail for six Uighurs accused of “splittism and organising and leading terrorist groups”, and implicated Hizb ut-Tahrir.

One of the men was found guilty of “proactively carrying out extremist religious activities and promoting ‘jihad’, establishing a terrorist training base and preparing to set up an ‘Islamic caliphate'”, Xinhua reported. One of the men was found guilty of “proactively carrying out extremist religious activities and promoting ‘jihad’, establishing a terrorist training base and preparing to set up an ‘Islamic caliphate’,” Xinhua reported.

In April, the Xinjiang government blamed Hizb ut-Tahrir for inciting protests in Khotan, in which the World Uyghur Congress said about 1,000 people took to the streets. In April, the Xinjiang government blamed Hizb ut-Tahrir for inciting protests in Khotan, in which the World Uyghur Congress said about 1000 people took to the streets.

“By linking the unrest to Hizb ut-Tahrir there’s legal cause for suggesting that these individuals were involved in a transnational conspiracy to set up an Islamic state and destabilise China,” Gladney said. “By linking the unrest to Hizb ut-Tahrir there’s legal cause for suggesting that these individuals were involved in a transnational conspiracy to set up an Islamic state and destabilise China,” Gladney said.

“It’s not clear that the civil unrest had any of those goals in mind,” he added. “It’s not clear that the civil unrest had any of those goals in mind,” he added. “They were pretty disorganised.” “They were pretty disorganised.”

Still, authorities launched a propaganda drive last year targeting what China says are the true intentions of Hizb ut-Tahrir. Still, authorities launched a propaganda drive last year targeting China says what are the true intentions of Hizb ut-Tahrir.

“Be very clear about the ‘Islamic Liberation Party’s’ reactionary nature,” the Kashgar government said in a notice on its website. “Be very clear about the ‘Islamic Liberation Party’s’ reactionary nature,” the Kashgar government said in a notice on its website. “Be very clear about their pervasive and actual threat to Xinjiang and Kashgar.” “Be very clear about their pervasive and actual threat to Xinjiang and Kashgar.”

Yet while some Uighurs say they have heard of Hizb ut-Tahrir, they dismiss it as being irrelevant to their situation. Yet while some Uighurs say they have heard of Hizb ut-Tahrir, they dismiss it as being irrelevant to their situation.

“What we want is simple — freedom,” said a Uighur resident of Xinjiang’s regional capital, Urumqi, who asked not be identified, fearing repercussions with the authorities. “What we want is simple – freedom,” said a resident of Uighur Xinjiang’s regional capital, Urumqi, who asked not be identified, fearing repercussions with the authorities. “But there are too many Han and too few of us.” “But there are too many Han and too few of us.”

(Editing by Brian Rhoads and Jerry Norton) (For more stories visit our multimedia website “Road to Beijing” at :
http://www.reuters.com/news/sports/2008olympics; and see our blog at http://blogs.reuters.com/china ) http://www.reuters.com/news/sports/2008olympics; and see our blog at http://blogs. reuters.com / China

FEATURE-Radical Islam stirs in China’s remote west on July 28 2008 06:26:08 GMT

By Ben Blanchard
KASHGAR, China, July 28 (Reuters) – In a backstreet of the old Silk Road city of Kashgar, Chinese authorities have been spray-painting signs on dusty mud brick walls to warn against what it says is a new enemy — the Islamic Liberation Party. KASHGAR, China, July 28 (Reuters) – In a backstreet of the old Silk Road city of Kashgar, Chinese authorities have been spray-painting signs on dusty mud brick walls to warn against what it says is a new enemy – the Islamic Liberation Party.

Better known as Hizb ut-Tahrir, the group says its goal is to establish a pan-national Muslim state, or Caliphate. Better known as Hizb ut-Tahrir, the group says its goal is to establish a pan-national Muslim state, or Caliphate.

China says Hizb ut-Tahrir are terrorists operating in the far western region of Xinjiang, home to some 8 million Muslim, Turkic-speaking Uighurs, many of whom chafe under Chinese rule. China says Hizb ut-Tahrir are terrorists operating in the far western region of Xinjiang, home to some 8 million Muslim, Turkic-speaking Uighurs, many of whom chafe under Chinese rule.

But the group and some observers say it does not espouse violence and accuse China of playing up the threat as an excuse to further crack down in restive Xinjiang, especially ahead of the Beijing Olympics. But the group and some observers say it does not espouse violence and accuse China of playing up the threat as an excuse to further crack down on restive Xinjiang, especially ahead of the Beijing Olympics.

“Strike hard against the Islamic Liberation Party” and “The Islamic Liberation Party is a violent terrorist organisation” read the signs in Kashgar, written in red in both Chinese and Uighur’s Arabic-based script. “Strike hard against the Islamic Liberation Party” and “The Islamic Liberation Party is a violent terrorist organisation” read the signs in Kashgar, written in red in both Chinese and Uighur’s Arabic-based script.

Residents passing by appear to pay little heed to the notices, accustomed to barrages of government propaganda denouncing “splittism”, “illegal religious activities” and calling for ethnic unity and harmony. Residents passing by appear to pay little heed to the notices, accustomed to barrages of government propaganda denouncing “splittism”, “illegal religious activities” and calling for ethnic unity and harmony.

“I don’t know what that group is,” said one Uighur, who declined to give his name, shaking his head and scurrying away. “I do not know what that group is,” said one Uighur, who declined to give his name, shaking his head and scurrying away.

As in another strife-hit Chinese region, Tibet, many Uighurs resent the growing economic and cultural impact of Han Chinese who have in some cases been encouraged by the government to move to far-flung and under-populated parts of the country. As in another strife-hit Chinese region of Tibet, many Uighurs resent the growing economic and cultural impact of Han Chinese who have in some cases been encouraged by the government to move to far-flung and under-populated parts of the country.

Beijing accuses militant Uighurs of working with al Qaeda to use terror to bring about an independent state called East Turkestan. Beijing accuses militant Uighurs of working with al Qaeda to use terror to bring about an independent state called East Turkestan.

The government says it has foiled several Xnjiang-based plots this year to launch attacks during or in the run-up to the Games, including one which apparently would see athletes targeted by suicide bombers or be kidnapped. The government says it has foiled several plots Xnjiang-based this year to launch attacks during or in the run-up to the Games, including one which would see athletes apparently targeted by suicide bombers or be kidnapped.

But the emergence of Hizb ut-Tahrir is a recent phenomenon in Xinjiang. But the emergence of Hizb ut-Tahrir is a recent phenomenon in Xinjiang.

“The organisation is extremely resilient and its influence, although limited to southern Xinjiang, seems to be growing,” said Nicholas Bequelin of Human Rights Watch. “The organisation is extremely resilient and its influence, although limited to southern Xinjiang, seems to be growing,” said Nicholas Bequelin of Human Rights Watch.

“The prison authorities are also worried about the influence of Hizbut followers on other inmates,” he added. “The prison authorities are also worried about the influence of Hizbut followers on other inmates,” he added.

But it seems unlikely they represent the threat to Xinjiang that China likes to portray, said Dru Gladney, a Uighur expert and president of the Pacific Basin Institute at Pomona College, California. But it seems unlikely they represent the threat to Xinjiang that China likes to portray, said Dru Gladney, a Uighur expert and president of the Pacific Basin Institute at Pomona College, California.

“For most Uighurs who are activists, though some of them are very religious in their Islam, their main goal is sovereignty for Xinjiang. Hizb ut-Tahrir doesn’t support that. They support a worldwide Caliphate, not any one independent region,” he said. “For most Uighurs who are activists, though some of them are very religious in their Islam, their main goal is sovereignty for Xinjiang. Hizb ut-Tahrir does not support that. They support a worldwide Caliphate, not any one independent region,” he said.

RUNNING ON XINJIANG TIME RUNNING TIME ON XINJIANG

Though a part of China, many areas in Xinjiang feel a world away from the booming and cosmopolitan cities on the Chinese coast, far to the east. Though a part of China, many areas in Xinjiang feel a world away from the booming and cosmopolitan cities on the Chinese coast, far to the east.

In Kashgar, a city close to the Pakistan and Afghan borders, some women not only cover their heads, but also veil their faces. In Kashgar, a city close to the Pakistan and Afghan borders, some women not only cover their heads, but also veil their faces. In some cases, dark brown cloths envelope the whole head. In some cases, dark brown envelope cloths the whole head.

Clocks in many mosques, restaurants, cafes and shops are set to Xinjiang time. Clocks in many mosques, restaurants, cafes and shops are set to Xinjiang time. This is two hours behind Beijing time, the official standard for the entire country, which means China’s sun does not set until after 10 pm in Kashgar in the summer. This is two hours behind Beijing time, the official standard for the entire country, which means China’s sun does not set until after 10 pm in Kashgar in the summer.

Exiled groups and human rights campaigners have long chastised China for its religious restrictions. Exiled groups and human rights campaigners have long chastised China for its religious restrictions. The government hits back and says it guarantees freedom of religion in its constitution, as long as believers respect the law. The government hits back and says it guarantees freedom of religion in its constitution, as long as believers respect the law.

Many are not convinced Hizb ut-Tahrir is the threat the Chinese government says it is in Xinjiang. Many are not convinced Hizb ut-Tahrir is the threat the Chinese government says it is in Xinjiang.

“This does not exist. They have come up with this group’s name themselves,” said Dilxat Raxit, spokesman for the exiled World Uyghur Congress. “This does not exist. They have come up with this group’s name themselves,” said Dilxat Raxit, spokesman for the exiled World Uyghur Congress. “They are trying to mislead the world and deflect from concern for the Uighur people.” “They are trying to mislead the world and deflect from concern for the Uighur people.”

For its part, Hizb ut-Tahrir denies it advocates violence. For its part, Hizb ut-Tahrir denies it advocates violence.

“Hizb ut-Tahrir and Muslim voices that do not toe the government line have been severely oppressed by the Chinese government,” Taji Mustafa, media representative for Hizb ut-Tahrir Britain, told Reuters in an emailed statement. “Hizb ut-Tahrir and Muslim voices that do not toe the government line have been severely oppressed by the Chinese government,” Taji Mustafa, media representative for Hizb ut-Tahrir Britain, told Reuters in an emailed statement.

“It is well known across the world that since its founding in 1953, Hizb ut-Tahrir has exclusively engaged in non-violent political and intellectual work,” Mustafa added. “It is well known across the world that since its founding in 1953, Hizb ut-Tahrir has exclusively engaged in non-violent political and intellectual work,” Mustafa added. He did not comment on whether the group was active in Xinjiang. He did not comment on whether the group was active in Xinjiang.

SPLITTISM

China maintains the threat is real. Hizb ut-Tahrir is likewise banned in countries such as Uzbekistan, where it has also been blamed for violence. China maintains the threat is real Hizb ut-Tahrir is likewise banned in countries such as Uzbekistan, where it has also been blamed for violence.

In November, China’s Xinhua news agency announced sentences ranging from death to life in jail for six Uighurs accused of “splittism and organising and leading terrorist groups”, and implicated Hizb ut-Tahrir. In November, China’s Xinhua news agency announced sentences ranging from death to life in jail for six Uighurs accused of “splittism and organising and leading terrorist groups”, and implicated Hizb ut-Tahrir.

One of the men was found guilty of “proactively carrying out extremist religious activities and promoting ‘jihad’, establishing a terrorist training base and preparing to set up an ‘Islamic caliphate'”, Xinhua reported. One of the men was found guilty of “proactively carrying out extremist religious activities and promoting ‘jihad’, establishing a terrorist training base and preparing to set up an ‘Islamic caliphate’,” Xinhua reported.

In April, the Xinjiang government blamed Hizb ut-Tahrir for inciting protests in Khotan, in which the World Uyghur Congress said about 1,000 people took to the streets. In April, the Xinjiang government blamed Hizb ut-Tahrir for inciting protests in Khotan, in which the World Uyghur Congress said about 1000 people took to the streets.

“By linking the unrest to Hizb ut-Tahrir there’s legal cause for suggesting that these individuals were involved in a transnational conspiracy to set up an Islamic state and destabilise China,” Gladney said. “By linking the unrest to Hizb ut-Tahrir there’s legal cause for suggesting that these individuals were involved in a transnational conspiracy to set up an Islamic state and destabilise China,” Gladney said.

“It’s not clear that the civil unrest had any of those goals in mind,” he added. “It’s not clear that the civil unrest had any of those goals in mind,” he added. “They were pretty disorganised.” “They were pretty disorganised.”

Still, authorities launched a propaganda drive last year targeting what China says are the true intentions of Hizb ut-Tahrir. Still, authorities launched a propaganda drive last year targeting China says what are the true intentions of Hizb ut-Tahrir.

“Be very clear about the ‘Islamic Liberation Party’s’ reactionary nature,” the Kashgar government said in a notice on its website. “Be very clear about the ‘Islamic Liberation Party’s’ reactionary nature,” the Kashgar government said in a notice on its website. “Be very clear about their pervasive and actual threat to Xinjiang and Kashgar.” “Be very clear about their pervasive and actual threat to Xinjiang and Kashgar.”

Yet while some Uighurs say they have heard of Hizb ut-Tahrir, they dismiss it as being irrelevant to their situation. Yet while some Uighurs say they have heard of Hizb ut-Tahrir, they dismiss it as being irrelevant to their situation.

“What we want is simple — freedom,” said a Uighur resident of Xinjiang’s regional capital, Urumqi, who asked not be identified, fearing repercussions with the authorities. “What we want is simple – freedom,” said a resident of Uighur Xinjiang’s regional capital, Urumqi, who asked not be identified, fearing repercussions with the authorities. “But there are too many Han and too few of us.” “But there are too many Han and too few of us.”

(Editing by Brian Rhoads and Jerry Norton) (For more stories visit our multimedia website “Road to Beijing” at :
http://www.reuters.com/news/sports/2008olympics; and see our blog at http://blogs.reuters.com/china ) http://www.reuters.com/news/sports/2008olympics; and see our blog at http://blogs. reuters.com / China)

Rebiya Kadeer meets with President Bush at the White House

Yesterday Press Releases
index

Yesterday morning at the White House, Uyghur democracy leader Rebiya Kadeer met with President George W. Bush, together with four other human rights leaders, to discuss the human rights situation in the People’s Republic of China (PRC). During the meeting, President Bush expressed his support for Uyghurs’ quest for human rights and democracy, and assured the five activists that he would voice their human rights concerns with PRC officials when he travels to Beijing in just over a week’s time to attend the Olympic Games. Together with Wei Jingsheng, Bob Fu, Harry Wu, and Dr. Sasha Gong, Ms. Kadeer expressed gratitude for President Bush’s demonstrated commitment to promoting freedom and democratic reform in the PRC.

The five activists also spoke about their personal experience as victims of Chinese government persecution, and their efforts to peacefully promote human rights reforms within China. “I was deeply honored to meet with the President, and to hear his words of support for the Uyghur people on the eve of the Beijing Olympics,” said Ms. Kadeer.
“His decision to meet with us at this time will send a powerful message to the Chinese government that it does not have a free hand to commit human rights abuses.” During the meeting, President Bush specifically expressed concern about the situation of Ms. Kadeer’s sons Alim and Ablikim Abdureyim, who are currently serving lengthy prison sentences in the PRC. He indicated that he would raise their cases with Chinese leaders during his visit to Beijing. Ms. Kadeer expressed her concerns over the Beijing regime’s recent harsh campaign of repression on peaceful Uyghur dissent in the name of anti-terrorism.
The Uyghur American Association (UAA) applauds President Bush for meeting with Ms. Kadeer and the other human rights figures, and for demonstrating his commitment to promoting human rights and democracy in East Turkestan and throughout the PRC. UAA would also like to thank the members of the U.S. Congress who supported H. Res. 1370, calling on the Chinese government to “immediately end abuses of the human rights of its citizens” and to “cease repression of Tibetan and Uighur citizens.” The resolution passed in the House of Representatives this afternoon.
UAA would especially like to thank House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Howard Berman for sponsoring the bill. Ms. Kadeer previously met with President Bush in June 2007 in Prague, where he delivered a speech at a conference on democracy and security. During the speech, the President praised Ms. Kadeer as a human rights defender, citing her as an individual who has struggled for freedom, democracy and human rights in the face of tyranny.

Türkei Regierungspartei wird nicht verboten

VON GERD HÖHLER

Recep Tayyip Erdogan (Foto: dpa)
Der türkische Ministerpräsident Tayyip Erdogan kann weiter regieren. Das Verfassungsgericht in Ankara wies am Mittwoch den Antrag des Generalstaatsanwalts Abdurrahman Yalcinkaya, Erdogans islamisch-konservative Gerechtigkeits- und Entwicklungspartei (AKP) zu verbieten, zurück. Gerichtspräsident Hasim Kilic gab die Entscheidung am Abend bekannt.Bei der entscheidenden Abstimmung votierten zwar sechs der elf Verfassungsrichter für ein Verbot. Damit wurde aber die für einen solchen Beschluss erforderliche Mehrheit von mindestens sieben Stimmen knapp verfehlt. Das elfköpfige Richtergremium hatte über das Urteil seit Montag insgesamt rund 33 Stunden lang beraten.

Die Anklage habe keine hinreichenden Beweise erbringen können, dass die Partei gegen die Verfassung verstoßen habe, sagte Kilic. Die AKP muss aber staatliche Wahlkampfhilfen zurückzahlen. Um welchen Betrag es dabei geht, war zunächst nicht klar.Verfassungsgerichtspräsident Kilic sagte, dies sei “eine ernste Warnung” an die AKP. “Ich hoffe, sie wird die nötigen Lehren daraus ziehen”, mahnte Kilic. Eine ausführliche Urteilsbegründung wird erst in den nächsten erwartet. Auch mit seinem Antrag, 71 führenden AKP-Funktionären, unter ihnen Staatspräsident Abdullah Gül und Premier Erdogan, für fünf Jahre jede parteipolitische Betätigung zu untersagen, konnte sich der Ankläger nicht durchsetzen.

Konflikt schwelt seit AKP-Wahlsieg im November 2002Das Mitte März mit der Anklage des Generalstaatsanwalts in Gang gesetzte Verbotsverfahren war der bisherige Höhepunkt eines erbitterten Machtkampfes zwischen den religiös geprägten, aber zugleich reformorientierten und pro-europäischen Kräften um Ministerpräsident Erdogan auf der einen und der kemalistischen Elite sowie den Militärs auf der anderen Seite.Der Konflikt schwelte seit dem ersten Wahlsieg der AKP im November 2002. Die erst 15 Monate zuvor gegründete AKP wurde damals mit 34 Prozent der Wählerstimmen stärkste Partei und gewann die absolute Mehrheit der Mandate. Bei den vorgezogenen Parlamentswahlen vom Juli 2007 erzielte Erdogans Partei sogar fast 47 Prozent, den höchsten Stimmenanteil für eine türkische Partei seit vier Jahrzehnten.

Mit der Entscheidung des Verfassungsgerichts kann die Regierung zwar einen Erfolg verbuchen, mit dem die meisten Beobachter noch vor wenigen Tagen gar nicht gerechnet hatten. Der Konflikt um den es geht, dürfte aber weiter schwelen und könnte schon bei nächster Gelegenheit wieder aufbrechen. Vor allem die mächtigen Militärs, die sich als Erben Atatürks und als Wächter über die weltliche Verfassungsordnung verstehen, werden weiterhin jeden Schritt der AKP misstrauisch verfolgen.Das türkische Militär hat seit 1960 bereits vier gewählte Regierungen abgesetzt. Beobachter meinen, die Generäle würden nicht zögern erneut einzugreifen, wenn sie die Trennung von Staat und Religion in Gefahr sehen. Erdogan dürfte deshalb zumindest in den kommenden Monaten alles daransetzen, den Konflikt zu entschärfen. Kontroverse Themen wie das Kopftuchverbot wird der türkische Premier wohl auf absehbare Zukunft tunlichst meiden.

Prézidént Bush Rabiye Qadir Xanimni Aqsarayda Qobul Qilip Körüshti

Bügün yeni 7‏ – Ayning 29‏ – küni Amérika Prézidénti Jurj Bush Uyghur milliy herikitining rehbiri we dunya uyghur qurultiyining reisi Rabiye xanim shuningdek Wiy jéngshing , Hariy wu qatarliq Xitay démokratlirini aqsarayda qobul qildi.

Uchrishishta Rabiye Qadir xanim, Xitay hökümitining Beijing olimpik tenheriket yighini harpisida Uyghurlargha qaratqan basturush siyasiti, kishilik hoquq depsendichilikliri heqqide prézidént Bushqa melumat bergen hemde prézidént Bushtin Xitay dölet reisi Hu jintao bilen körüshkende, Uyghurlar mesilsini otturigha qoyushini telep qilghan.

Bu qétimqi uchrishish, Uyghur milliy herikitining rehbiri we dunya uyghur qurultiyining reisi Rabiye Qadir xanimning Amérika prézidénti Jurj Bush bilen ikkinchi qétimliq uchrishishi hésablinidu. Amérika prézidénti Jurj Bush tunji qétim 2006‏ – yili Chéx jumhuriyitining paytexti Praga shehiride Rabiye Qadir xanimni qobul qilip, Rabiye xanimgha we uning herikitige yuqiri baha bergen idi.

Uchrishishtin kéyin ziyaritimizni qobul qilghan Rabiye Qadir xanim, Bei jing olimpik tenheriket yighinigha 10 kün qalghan bir mezgilde, Amérika prézidénti Jurj Bushning özini we Xitay démokratlirini aqsarayda qobul qilghanliqini Xitaygha bérilgen bir signal dep körsetti .

Menbe:http://www.uygur.org/uygurche/uchur/2008/07_30.htm

Osttürkistan

-Ein Buch Erschient Über Uyghurische Heimatland
Kurzbeschreibung Achtung das Buch ist in Türkisch.Die Uiguren leben im Nordwesten Chinas. Sie sind ein Moslemisches Volk.

Ausführliche Beschreibung Die Uiguren leben im Nordwesten Chinas. Sie sind ein Moslemisches Volk. Ihr Land Osttürkistan wurde im Jahr 1949 Vom China besetzt. Niergendswo auf der Welt gibt es so viel unterdürckung und angst wie in dem Land der Uiguren. Seit 1995 Wurden mehr als 700 Uiguren aus Politischen gründen exekutiert. Die Uguiren sind ein Türk Volk, sie bilden innerhalb der Türkvölker die mehr als aus 31 stämmen bestehen, mit 20 millionen eine grosse gruppe. Das Buch ist eine Reise reportaje, der über das leben der Uiguren berichtet.

Ömer Salih, Jahrgang 1969
Ich wurde in der Türkei geboren. Seit meinem 14. Lebensjahr lebe ich in Deutschland. Ich bin Grafiker, Fotograf, Jornalist und Weltwanderer. Ich habe in mein leben viele geschäfte angefangen und alles ist zu bruch gegangen. Das einzige was ich gut kann ist viele sprachen und Reisen. Angst kenne ich nicht. Ich habe in den Bergen alleine geschlafen. Ich bin im gesamten zentral asien mit einer kamera in der hand alleine gereist. Es ist mein erstes Buch in Türkische sprache bald folgen die Bücher in Deutsch.

Autor: Ömer Salih
Klebebindung Kategorie: Reise / Reiseführer
Kundenbewertung Schreiben Sie die erste Bewertung
Preis: 12,95 €

http://www.epubli.de/shop/showshopelement?pubId=225

We Honor Those Who Press For Their Liberties, People Like The Uighur People!


WASHINGTON (AFP) — US President George W. Bush on Monday paid tribute to “the courage of the Dalai Lama and the Buddhists in Tibet,” less than one month before heading to China for the Beijing Olympics opening gala.

Bush also reported that he told Chinese President Hu Jintao when they met last week in Japan: “So long as there are those who want to fight for their liberty, the United States stands with them.”

The US president, who has drawn fire for his decision to attend the August 8 opening ceremony for the Games, was speaking at a White House ceremony marking the 10th anniversary of a US law aimed at promoting global religious freedom.

“We remember those seeking religious freedom in China, and we honor those who press for their liberties, people like the Uighur Muslims,” said Bush.

“I also had the honor of meeting those who attend underground churches in China. And we also honor the courage of the Dalai Lama and the Buddhists in Tibet,” he said.

Bush cited “some hopeful progress during the last couple of years” in places like Turkmenistan and Vietnam but underlined that it was important to “remember the many people who have yet to secure this precious liberty.”

He cited Iran, “where the regime’s anti-Semitism has provoked global outrage,” Eritrea, Sudanese attacks on Christians, and North Korean punishment of “those caught practicing faiths other than the state ideology.”

He also cited “brutal raids” by Myanmar authorities on Buddhist monks, past repression of religious minorities in Uzbekistan, and expressed hope that promised Saudi reforms “can bring real change.”

“Today, we urge the leaders of all these countries to immediately end their abuses of religious freedom. We urge these leaders to respect the rights of those who seek only to worship their god as they see fit,” said Bush.

From:http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5jeh-N6FaJNSqIZuO_gDecRjUgp7g

Uyghurs Killed in Raid


2008-07-10

Chinese police stage a dramatic raid on a flat occupied by ethnic Uyghurs in the restive Eastturkestan/Xinjiang region.

Police in the Xinjiang capital, Urumqi, shot dead five ethnic Uyghurs in a raid July 8.

HONG KONG—Chinese police used smoke to force open a flat in the restive northwestern region of Xinjiang before shooting dead five ethnic Uyghurs inside who the official media said were planning a “holy war,” a witness to the incident has said.

“They threw a smoke bomb at the apartment. Then police got into the apartment and during this time one of the police was hurt by the one of the Uyghurs,” a neighbor and witness said.

“After this first injury, the police began to fire their guns. Five of the Uyghurs ended up dead. Women were also occupying the apartment at this time. All of these Uyghurs were young men and women,” the man, who asked to be identified only as Duan, said.

“They were only equipped with knives,” he said of the Uyghurs. “Now the situation is pretty peaceful in our neighborhood and normal. The police told us that they were terrorists.”

Now the situation is pretty peaceful in our neighborhood and normal. The police told us that they were terrorists.”

Neighbor

On Tuesday, July 8, police in the Xinjiang capital, Urumqi, raided an apartment where 15 Uyghurs—a distinct Muslim minority—were hiding, the official Xinhua news agency said. It said they had rushed out wielding knives and shouting “sacrifice for Allah.”

Police opened fire, killing five and injuring two, Xinhua said. The incident comes just weeks before the opening of the Beijing Olympics under extremely tight security.

“The injured were sent to hospital and the other nine people were captured,” it quoted a police officer as saying. “The suspects confessed they had all received training on the launching of a ‘holy war.’ Their aim was to kill Han people, the most populous ethnic group in China whom they took as heretics, and found their own state,” it said.

‘Terrorist actions’

A Uyghur police officer, contacted by telephone, said only that the raid was “related to terrorist actions.” He said he didn’t know where the nine Uyghurs who were arrested or the two who were wounded were being held.

Another neighbor who asked to be identified as Li confirmed the five shooting deaths but downplayed its significance. “It was an ordinary robbery case. Let’s not exaggerate it,” he said, adding that he believed the use of deadly force was appropriate.

Another neighbor described the area as peaceful, with Uyghurs accounting for about 30 percent of the population of the building. “The environment is pretty good,” he said, adding that he had never witnessed tensions between Han Chinese and Uyghur residents.

A police officer also reported that Xinjiang police had recently stepped up their own security. “We have even been afraid to take a siesta,” he said. Asked if they were feared retaliation, he replied, “Yes.”

An officer on duty at the Xinjiang Public Security Bureau denied any knowledge of the incident.

“I cannot talk about these things,” the officer said. “I don’t know anything about it.” He then hung up the phone.

Long history

Dilxat Raxit, exiled spokesman of the World Uyghur Congress, sharply criticized the shootings.

“To shoot and kill has become a new method of cracking down on Uyghurs in China. We call on the United Nations to send international lawyers and give effective legal assistance to those Uyghurs in detention so that the truth can be known,” he said.

Uyghurs, like Tibetans, have a long history under Beijing’s heavy-handed rule-which has at times erupted in violence.

But exiled Uyghurs deny the existence of an organized terrorist campaign and say previous incidents have been fabricated or exaggerated to secure international support for a crackdown.

In March, Chinese authorities said they had broken up and arrested members of a group that were threatening to sabotage the Beijing Olympics.

China has waged a campaign over the last decade against what it says are violent separatists and Islamic extremists who aim to establish an independent state in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, which shares a border with Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Mongolia.

After the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks on the United States, Beijing took the position that Uyghur groups were connected with al-Qaeda and that one group, the East Turkestan Islamic Movement (ETIM), was a “major component of the terrorist network headed by Osama bin Laden.” The ETIM has denied that charge.

Original reporting by RFA’s Mandarin, Cantonese, and Uyghur services. Mandarin service director: Jennifer Chou. Cantonese service director: Shiny Li. Uyghur service director: Dolkun Kamberi. Written and produced in English by Sarah Jackson-Han.

Sherqiytürkistan Birliki Teshkilati Xitaygha Qarshi Namayish Élip Bardi


2008-yili 7-Ayning 12-Küni Sherqiytürkistan Birliki Teshkilati Gérmaniyening Frankfurt Sheheride Xitaygha Qarshi Namayish Teshkillep, Xitaylarning Sherqiytürkistanda yürgüziwatqan pashistik siyasetlirige bolghan naraziliqini ipadilidi.

Buningdin birqanche kün burun Sherqiytürkistan Musteqilliq Herkitining Lédiri, Xelqara Kishlik hoquq paaliyetchisi, Dunya Uyghur Qurultiyining reyisi Rabiye Qadir öz namidin uxturush chiqirip, 2008-Yili kirgendin buyan Sherqiytürkistanda yüz bériwatqan érqiy we kultural qirghinchiliq jümlidin mushu ayning 8-künidin 10-künigiche xelqimizning béshigha chüshken éghir musubet sewebidin, pütün dunyadiki Sherqiytürkistan teshkilatlirini Xitaygha qarshi namayish teshkilleshke chaqriq qilghanidi. Teshkilatimiz bu chaqriqqa awaz qoshup Gérmaniyening Frankfurt Sheheride Namayish élip bardi. Namayish Xitayda ötküzülidighan 2008-yilliq Olimpiyat, Uyghur yashlirining araqa-arqidin qirghinchiliqqa uchrishi we barghanche ewij éliwatqan ölüm jazasi bérish weqesi we Sherqiytürkistandiki insan heqliri we kishlik hoquq depsendichiliki qatarliq témilarda bolup ötti.

Xitay Hökümiti 2008-yil kirgendin béri Sherqiytürkistan xelqige bolghan milliy we érqiy zulumni téximu kücheytip, özining qanliq qamchisini Uyghur xelqining béshida oynatmaqta.Yillardin béri Uyghur we uning qérindashliri 2001-yili yüz bergen qanliq11-Séntebir weqesining derdini tartip kelgen bolsa, 2008-yili kirgendin béri tarixtin béri insanlargha dostluq, tinchliq we muhhabet béghishlap kelgen, bexit we qérindashliqning simiwoli bolghan Xelqara Olimpik Musabiqisining we Xitayda yüz bergen éghir tebéiy apetning ziyinigha uchrap kelmekte.

Xitaylar bu yil kirgendin béri bir qatar saxta dirammilarni qurashturup chiqip, Xitay mustemlikichillirige ghezep-nepriti téship turghan, sewri-taqiti toshup eziz wetinimiz Sherqiytürkistanning milliy musteqilliqini kiche-kündüz arzu qiliwatqan, eng eqelliy insaniy heq-hoquqliridinmu ayrilip qalghan, weten-millet üchün jénini pida qilishni xalaydighan qanche yüzligen yashlirimizni uzaqtin pissixologiylik kontorol qilish, ichige jasus soqush, ular toplushup küchni merkezleshtürüshke bashlighanda torni yighip, kolléktip qetliam qilish ishlirini élip berip, démokiratiyelishish we insan heqlirini ishqa ashurushni mexset qilghan milliy herkitimizning wetende bash kötürüshige éghir zerbe bérip keldi.


Bigunah Uyghur xelqi 1991-yili Aprildin 2001-yil Séntebirgiche bolghan ariliqta qanche minglighan ot yürek perzentliridin ayrilip, Xitay dölet térorining qurbanigha aylinip ketti.

Yoqarqi qanliq Téragédiyeni keltürüp chiqiriwatqan Xitay basmichilliri bir tereptin milliy höriyiti üchün küresh qiliwatqan xelqimizni wehshiylerche bastursa yene bir tereptin özlirining ewzel teshwiqat quralliridin paydilinip, uyghurlarni xelqara jamaetchilikke set körsütüshke orunup keldi. Xitaylar özining sot, edeliye, armiye, istixbarat we amanliq saqlash qisimlirining Uyghurlarni bir pütün millet süpitide tarix seyipisidin öchüriwétishtin ibaret qanliq téragédiyeni oynishigha perde arqisi we perde aldida réjisorluq qilip, 30 milyondin ashidighan Sherqiytürkistan xelqini pissixik, jismaniy we maddiy tereplerdin kolliktip halette qirghin qildi, Chongluqi 1 milyon 900 ming kuwadirat kélométirdin ashidighan bu ghayet zor tupraqni üsti ochuq türkmige aylandurdi. Bu yerde yashaydighan yerlik xeliqlerning ittipaqliqini buzghandin bashqa , xitay milliti bilen ularning ottursida toxtimay öchekishidighan Pan-Xitayizim höküm sürgen siyasiy kélima tni barliqqa keltürdi.


Bu yil kirgendin béri yeni 2008-yili 27-Yaniwarda Aqtu naheside yüz bergen kolliktip qirghin xaraktérini alghan kosorap weqesi , 2008-yili 2-Ayning 4-küni Ürümchide 18 uyghurgha ölüm jazasi bérish weqesi , 2008-yili 2-ayning 18-küniki Ürümchidin Xitaygha uchidighan Ayripilanni bir uyghur qizining partilitishni pilanlighanliqi weqesi, 2008-yili 1-Ayning 27-küniki Sherqiytürkistanning bashbaliqi Ürümchide yüz bergen 15 Uyghur yashning Sherqiytürkistan dölitini qurushqa orunghan „térorchi“lar , dégen jinayet bilen qolgha élinip, birqanchisining nex meydanda étip tashlanghanliqi weqesi, 2008-yili 3-Ayning 25-küni Ürümchide bir türküm Uyghurlarning Aptobus partilitishqa orunghan dégen betnam bilen qolgha élinghanliq weqesi, 2008-yili 23-Marttin 26-Martqiche Ürümchi, Hotan, Qashqer we Ghuljida yüz bergen bir qatar ammiwiy herketlerde otturgha chiqqan kolléktip tutqun qilish weqesi, 2008-yili 4-Ayning 8-küni yüz bergen quralliq ikki uyghurning mashina bulash we partilitish weqesi, 2008-yili 26-Marttin 6-Aprelghiche Olimpikka buzghunchiliq qilishqa orunghan, chet-ellik muxbirlarni gürege élishni pilanlighan, dégen betnam bilen 45 Uyghur yashni qolgha élip qattiq basturghanliq weqesi we 16-, 17-, 18- Iyundiki Olimpik meshilini yetküzüsh bahaniside élip bérilghan kolléktip tutqun qilish weqesidin ibaret pütünley Xitay tajawuzchilliri jawapkar bolghan bir qatar hadésiler otturgha chiqqanidi.


Kishining diqqitini hemmidin tartidighini 2008-yilliq Olimpiyatqa bir ayghimu yetmigen waqit qalghanda, Xitaylar niqawini yirtip tashlap mushu ayning 8-künidin 9-künigiche bolghan ikki kün ichide Ürümchi we Qeshqerde zor bir türküm Uyghur yashlirini wehshiylerche tutqun qilip bezillirini neq meydanda étip tashlisa bezillirige ölüm jazasi we mudetsiz qamaq jazasi berdi. Bu qétimqi namayish del bu musubetlik künlerge toghra keldi.

Xelqara jamaet arqa-arqidin bayanat élan qilip, Xitaylarni Uyghurlar üstidin yürgüziwatqan érqiy qirghinni toxtutushqa dalalet qilghan bolsimu, xelqimiz duch kéliwatqan siyasiy teqdirde özgürüsh bolmay, Sherqiytürkistan weziyitining barghanche yamanliship kétishi xelqimizning qarshiliq körsütüsh milliy jasarétini téximu kücheytti.

Sherqiytürkistan Birliki Teshkilati Gérman xelqige Xitaylarning xelqara Teshkilatlar we bir qisim démokirattik döletlerning yüz xatérisini qilmay, bergen wedillirige wapasizliq qilip, Xelqara jamaetning köz aldida élip bériwatqan jinayi qilmishlirini pash qilish yüzisidin bu qétimqi namayishqa alahide teyyarliq qilghanidi. Namayishta „Xitay tajawuzchilliri wetinimizdin chiqip ketsun!“, „Bizge azatliq we Démokiratiye Kérek!“, „Qatil Xitaylar Uyghurlarni öltürüshni toxtat!“, „ Qatil Xitaylar Olimpiyatni ötküzüshke layiq kelmeydu!“, „ Sherqiy Türkistan Xitaylar teripidin munqerz qilinghan dölet!, „Bizge musteqiliq kérek!“ dégendek shuarlar yézilghan pilakatlar yézildi we towlandi.

Namayish Gérmaniyening Frankfurt Sheherining eng awat kochillirining biri bolghan Hauptiwache dégen yéride élip bérildi. Namayish jeryanida Xitaylarning Uyghur xelqi üstidin yürgüziwatqan dölet térori mezmun qilinghan ming parchige yéqin alahide teyyarlanghan teshwiqat matériyali tarqitildi.

Teshwiqat matériyallirida Sherqiytürkistanning tarixi, medeniyiti, xelqi, Jughrapiyelik alahidiliki we bügünki échinishliq siyasiy teqdiri tepsiliy we ilmiy otturgha qoyulghan bolup, kishilerning alahide diqqitini tartti.

Bu namayish bashtin-axir intayin tertiplik we ghelbilik boldi we Gérmaniye waqti saet 17:00 de bashlinip, 21:00 giche dawam qildi. (K.Atahan)

Sherqiytürkistan Birliki Teshkilati Teshwiqat Merkizi

12-Iyul 2008 Frankfurt/Gérmaniye

China schließt uigurische Website für Toleranz
03.07.2008 – 07.51 von Yiruisi

“Mein Hauptanliegen ist die Förderung des Verständnisses zwischen Uiguren und Han-Chinesen”, sagt ein uigurischer Professor, nachdem chinesische Behörden seine Website stillgelegt haben.

Chinesische Behörden haben eine Website zur Förderung der Toleranz zwischen Han-Chinesen und der ethnischen Minderheit der Uiguren auf Eis gelegt, nachdem die Website in Verbindung mit ausländischen “Extremisten” gebracht wurde, so Ilham Tohti, der Betreiber der erst vor zwei Jahren gegründeten chinesischsprachigen Website “Uyghur Online”.

Zu seiner eigenen Überraschung brachten uigurische Kollegen von Ilham Tohti, der als Professor für Wirtschaftswissenschaften an der Zentralen Nationalitäten-Universität in Beijing lehrt, diese Beschuldigungen den Behörden vor.
“Die Behörde für öffentliche Sicherheit (Public Security Bureau, PSB) veranlasste die Schließung und führt seitdem Untersuchungen durch.

Sie durchleuchteten uns aber haben nichts darüber gesagt, ob die Website wieder geöffnet werden kann”, sagte er.

“Sie sagten uns: ‘Machen Sie sich keine Sorgen. Nach den gegenwärtigen Gesetzen und Bedingungen können wir einige Diskussionsthemen nicht akzeptieren – diese sind heikel, aber nicht illegal.” Von dem in Peking ansässigen PSB gab es dazu, und ob oder wann die Website wieder zugänglich sein wird, keinen Kommentar. Ebenso wenig klar sind die Motive derjenigen Uiguren, die die Website angeschwärzt haben.

Tohti sagt, seine Website hatte manchmal bis zu einer Million Seitenaufrufe täglich – er beschäftigte 67 Menschen aus 12 Nationalitäten, alle arbeiteten unentgeltlich. Der Inhalt wurde in chinesischer Schrift veröffentlicht, geschrieben wurde von Uiguren, Han-Chinesen, Koreanern, Tibetern und vielen anderen Nationalitäten.

Verständnis fördern

“Ich möchte Verständnis und Toleranz zwischen Uiguren und Han-Chinesen fördern”, sagt Tohti und fügt hinzu, dass er glaubt, seine Website habe ein wenig dazu beigetragen. “Uiguren sind friedliche Menschen – wir müssen dies den Han-Chinesen sagen, da sie uns nicht verstehen.”
“Einige unserer Leserinnen und Leser sind intellektuelle Han-Chinesen. Sie möchten andere Nationalitäten verstehen lernen – sie versuchen es. Es sind nicht viele, aber ihre Zahl hat stetig zugenommen. Han-Chinesen machen mehr als 90 Prozent der Bevölkerung aus, deshalb ist es wichtig, dass sie uns verstehen. Ich habe keine politische Agenda “, sagt Tohti.

Die Website “war sehr hilfreich … viele Dinge haben dazu beigetragen, dass die Menschen einander verstehen, aber nicht alle Menschen unterstützen meine Website. Einige Leute werfen mir vor, ich würde Lügen verbreiten. Andere haben sogar an meine Hochschule geschrieben und verlangt dass ich gefeuert werde. Han-Chinesen werfen mir vor, ich sei ein ‘Spalter’ “.

Als “Spalter” bezeichnen chinesische Behörden jene, denen Unabhängigkeitsbestrebungen von Peking vorgeworfen werden; oft werden Tibeter so bezeichnet.
“Andere Menschen unterstützen meine Arbeit und schreiben wirklich sehr gute Dinge, z.B. Intellektuelle oder Regierungs-Mitarbeiter, so das auch das intellektuelle Level meiner Leser steigt “, sagt Tohti. “Uiguren können ihre Probleme nicht durch Terrorismus oder Slogans lösen. Sie müssen wissen, wie sie ihre Interessen legal verteidigen können.”

Einige Exil-Uiguren haben die Menschen in die Irre geführt, meint er.
“Unsere uigurischen Intellektuelle führen die Menschen nicht auf einen richtigen Pfad. Einige von ihnen sagten, dass die chinesischen Gesetze nicht für Uiguren gelten würden, was aber nicht der Wahrheit entspricht. Nach chinesischem Recht spielt die ethnische Zugehörigkeit keine Rolle – alle Menschen müssen gleich behandelt werden.”
Soziale Probleme wären hingegen ein anderes Thema. Einige soziale Probleme könne man nicht durch das Gesetz lösen: ” Die Uiguren müssen die Gesetze kennen und die rechtlichen Instrumente zur Verteidigung ihrer Interessen finden.”

Sprachgenie

Professor Tohti wurde am 25.10.1969 in Atush in der autonomen Provinz Xinjiang geboren. Er ist Absolvent der Northeast Normal University und der Economics School der Zentralen Nationalitäten-Universität in Peking. Er studierte in Korea, Japan und Pakistan, und besuchte viele andere Länder.

Bewandert in Englisch, Chinesisch, Koreanisch, Japanisch und Urdu, ist er derzeit Professor der Wirtschaftswissenschaften an der Zentralen Nationalitäten-Universität. Er ist auch Vorsitzender und Manager der “Uyghur Online Web Technology Development Co. Ltd” und Gast-Professor an der Universität von Kasachstan.

Unruhige Minderheiten

Sowohl Tibeter als auch Uiguren – zwei der wichtigsten religiösen und ethnischen Minderheiten Chinas – sind aufgebracht über Pekings harte Hand der vergangenen sechs Jahrzehnte. Die chinesischen Behörden müssen sich anhaltende Vorwürfe der Unterdrückung und des Missbrauchs gefallen lassen.

China führt seit 10 Jahren eine Kampagne gegen – wie sie es nennen – gewalttätige Separatisten und islamische Extremisten, deren Ziel die Schaffung eines unabhängigen Staates in Xinjiang sei. Die Autonome Region Xinjiang hat eine gemeinsame Grenze mit Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tadschikistan, Kirgisien, Kasachstan, Russland und der Mongolei.

Seit dem 11. September 2001 vertritt Peking die Position, dass uigurische Gruppen in Verbindung mit al-Qaida stehen und dass die “East Turkestan Islamic Movement” (ETIM) ein “wesentlicher Bestandteil des terroristischen Netzwerks von Osama bin Laden”sei. Die ETIM bestreitet dies.

Von:http://http://www.xinhua.de/index.php?entry=entry080703-075127

Faking the Olympic Spirit in China’s Muslim Region

Andreas Lorenz

The Olympic torch is in China’s far West and security is tight. Still, there are some who came out to celebrate the event — 200 invited guests and a handful of well-trained Uighar schoolchildren. Journalists were watched closely.

A gigantic statue of Mao waves to the people who have gathered in his shadow on Wednesday morning to celebrate the Olympic flame. But despite the size of the stone figure, there aren’t many milling about on Kashgar’s main square: Perhaps 200 invited guests — 200 out of the region’s 3.8 million residents. Ordinary citizens — apart from groups of school children in festive costumes — were not invited.

The children wave banners and flags and shout “Go China.” On the stage, the city’s ensemble performs Uighur folk dances to music so loud it risks awakening Mao in his glass coffin in Beijing, thousands of kilometers east of here.

Officials in white shirts give stilted speeches, until the last runner finally arrives, an older man with a traditional Uighur hat — called a dopa — on his head. Speaking into a microphone, he says it is a great honor to hold the Olympic torch in his hands. He then punches it into the air. It is a gesture the master of ceremonies practiced with him next to the grandstand beforehand.

The Olympic flame, which the government has declared sacred, has arrived in the far West, where it will spend three days on its long journey through China’s provinces. Kashgar is one of the country’s outposts; it used to be an important caravansary on the Silk Road with a British and a Russian consulate. Today it is known for its big Sunday market, where farmers still trade camels and horses.

Find out how you can reprint this SPIEGEL ONLINE article in your publication. In fact, the city is closer to Islamabad — both culturally and geographically — than to Beijing. Yet, just as the rest of China, it has undergone major changes in the last few years. Many of the old quarters with their mud houses and dark alleys have made way for broad streets and modern buildings.

Where once colorful market traders haggled near the famous Idkah Mosque, a sterile shopping center now stands. Donkey carts have become a rare sight in the city, whose residents weave around — almost silently — on battery-powered scooters.

In Kashgar the Han Chinese are a minority. In some quarters, they show their faces only very rarely. Some of them fear the Uighurs, with their European facial features and their women who hide their entire faces under brown cloth. Others pull their veils only over their noses. Most, however, only wear a headscarf.

‘Be Disciplined and Obey the Law’

In Kashgar men wearing dopas make copper caldrons and tin boxes in their workshops, sell honey and watermelons, gossip in tea houses and pray in the numerous small mosques.

The voices of the muezzins, however, can hardly be heard in the street during the day, as the Chinese authorities have banned them from using loudspeakers. And anyone under 18 years is not allowed to worship Allah in one of the mosques.

Many older Uighars hardly understand Chinese. Yet, many young people also have no grasp of the official language. Written in Arabic and Chinese on a mud wall in an alleyway is: “Be a good citizen, be disciplined and obey the law.”

“What I think of the torch relay?” a merchant in a teahouse asks. “Not much, as they are forcing all shops to close for two days. That means no revenue.”

In fact, many traders in the city center had to pull down their shutters a day before the Olympic flame arrived in Kashgar, creating a leaden atmosphere in the usually bustling streets.

On the day of the torch run, only invited guests from selected “work units” and schools were allowed to cheer on the runners from the roadside. The homes around the Idkah Mosque and the people’s square seemed deserted: No windows were open and no residents watched the spectacle from above. Meanwhile, soldiers, militia and police gathered in large numbers and hermetically sealed off the area around the mosque. They even stuck yellow tape over the storm drains.

The Chinese government is wary of its remote province, in particular of Kashgar. As in Tibet, Beijing sniffs a conspiracy in the autonomous Muslim region of Xinjiang — not by the “traitorous Dalai Lama clique,” but the Uighar separatists who are fighting for an independent East Turkistan.

Yet, how dangerous these groups are is unclear. Uighars in exile accuse Beijing of exaggerating the danger, to give it a reason to clamp down on religious groups.

The Chinese media, however, again and again reports attacks and conspiracies by Uighar terrorists. Recently staff of China Southern airline discovered a female passenger who tried to use gasoline to set a plane on fire. The government said it was a terrorist act, but so far it has failed to offer any proof of the real motives behind the attack.

‘More Cheering’

The fear, though, is great, and it overshadows the Kashgar stage of the torch run. There is no sign of the festive atmosphere that attended the first stage of the torch relay in China, on the tropical island of Hainan. In Kashgar nobody seems happy, though the image on television later will no doubt be a different one.

Everything has been rehearsed: “More cheering,” a regional television camera man tells a group of young people, who are not waving their Olympic flags enthusiastically enough for him.

Even here, far away from world public opinion, the Beijing Communist Party manages to instrumentalize the Olympic torch: to show a demonstration of unity between the party and the — non-existing — people, and a unified China.

“Write a beautiful chapter of harmony and progress — paint a magnificent painting of scientific progress,” the inscriptions of banners along the route read, “Welcome the Olympic Games with all your heart.”

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Tight Controls on Journalists

The few foreign journalists who have made the long journey into the desert are strangely referred to as “liberators” in their registration forms. Yet despite the moniker, they have not been liberated to watch the spectacle as they might have liked.

The authorities decided who was allowed to go to Kashgar. For “security reasons” they all have to stay at the shabby Qinibagh Hotel. Other hotels were instructed to turn away foreign journalists. Young helpers handed the journalists a comprehensive brochure, which mainly contains prohibitions and urges them “to show courtesy.”

The authorities have forbidden journalists to watch the torch relay from the roadside. The foreign press are only allowed to be at the start and finish, where they are first carefully searched and then closely monitored by officials.

The Olympics in China’s Wild West is no relaxed affair. Kashgar has been cowed and the Communist Party, with its security phobia, has the city totally in its grip. One wonders what the actual games in Beijing might look like. The answer comes blaring out of the loudspeakers under the Mao statue: “We are ready!”

From: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2034578/posts

Terrorism and the Olympics

NICHOLAS KRISTOF

We should encourage China to tolerate peaceful protesters even as it prosecutes terrorists. But instead of clarifying that distinction, we have helped China blur it.

Kashgar, China: The Chinese government has launched its own war on terror against Uighur separatists.

The reports of terror plots emanating this year from this Muslim region in the far west of China might seem fanciful: A foiled plot to blow up a plane; a cache of TNT to bomb the Summer Olympics; even a “violent terrorist gang” that planned to kidnap Olympic athletes.

But these aren’t whispers on the Internet. They’re reports coming from the Chinese government. So I flew out here to Kashgar — an oasis on the ancient Silk Road, where the minarets and camels and carpets provide a Middle Eastern ambience — to look for terrorists.

Instead, China’s State Security Ministry found me. I had been in Kashgar just a few hours when my videographer, who is ethnically Chinese, called to say that two plainclothes officials were interrogating him. They asked him not to tell me since American journalists tend to be touchy about such things.

FOUND IN…

This article has been provided by the New York Times as part of a special agreement between NYTimes.com. You can also find SPIEGEL stories at the New York Times on the Web. The interrogation was a sign of the authorities’ anxiety about stability in China’s Muslim west. Separatists here in the Xinjiang region aim to create the nation of “East Turkestan” and have periodically blown up police stations — even bombed three public buses in 1997.

The Chinese government has claimed that 162 people were killed in such terror attacks by Uighur separatists between 1990 and 2001. Meanwhile, China has sentenced more than 200 people to death since 1997 for engaging in such separatist crimes.

Last year, Chinese officials said that 18 people had been killed when police raided a Uighur terrorist training camp with ties to Al Qaeda. The raid netted 1,500 grenades.

Then in March, China announced that it had foiled a plot “to create an air crash,” in a passenger plane shortly after it took off from the Xinjiang capital of Urumqi. In April, the authorities said that they had confiscated explosives from Uighurs who were planning suicide bomb attacks.

“This violent terrorist gang secretly plotted to kidnap journalists, visitors and athletes during the Beijing Olympics,” The Associated Press quoted Wu Heping, a spokesman for the Public Security Ministry, as saying.

Then just this month, a crowded bus blew up in Shanghai, killing three people and injuring many more. No one publicly claimed responsibility, but it recalled the 1997 Uighur bus bombings.

Ronald Noble, the secretary general of Interpol, cited these incidents — and also reports of a separatist plot to disrupt the Olympic Games with poison gas — and told a press conference that a terror attack at the Olympics was “a real possibility.”

It’s not entirely clear what to make of all this, for as I strolled around Kashgar I found the situation remarkably calm. I wasn’t expecting to uncover a terrorist cell, but I had anticipated more hostility toward the government. Ordinary Uighurs I spoke with offered measured complaints, but they weren’t seething as Tibetans are.

“Nobody likes it when the Chinese all move in here,” said a Uighur shop-keeper. “Of course, we’re all upset. But what can we do?”

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One young woman offered a different take. “When I was a little kid, my mom would tell me, ‘Don’t wander or the Han Chinese will steal you away. They eat human flesh.’ ” She laughed and added: “But now we see more Han, and we’re not afraid of them. Relations are O.K.”

Some young Uighurs criticized the Beijing Olympics, saying the Games will drain local budgets. But I could have found stronger anti-government sedition on any street corner of Manhattan.

The only excitement I found in Kashgar was playing pied piper to State Security officers who tailed me whenever I left the hotel.

Normally, the Chinese government downplays security risks, but human rights groups argue persuasively that China is using concerns about Uighurs as an excuse to crack down on peaceful Uighur dissidents. After 9/11, China declared its own war on terror in Xinjiang, but Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International have documented that this often has targeted Uighurs who are completely nonviolent.

Unfortunately, the Bush administration has largely backed this Chinese version of the war on terror. Indeed, a Department of Justice report this month suggests that American troops softened up Uighur prisoners in Guantánamo Bay on behalf of visiting Chinese interrogators. The American troops starved the Uighurs and prevented them from sleeping, just before inviting in the Chinese interrogators.

That was disgraceful; we shouldn’t do China’s dirty work. It was one more example of the Bush administration allowing the war on terror to corrode our moral clarity.

We should encourage China to tolerate peaceful protesters even as it prosecutes terrorists. But instead of clarifying that distinction, in recent years we have helped China blur it. The risk of terrorism during the Olympics is real, but that shouldn’t force us to do violence to our principles.

From: http://www.spiegel.de/international/0,1518,556232,00.html